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All Things Garden,  Preserve Your Harvest,  Recipes

Crunchy Soaked & Roasted Pumpkin Seeds Recipe

Are you carving pumpkins, or perhaps cooking up a meal with fresh whole pumpkin? Don’t let the seeds go to waste! Instead, try our soaked and roasted pumpkin seeds recipe. Sure, you could skip the soaking and go straight to the roasting, and that is admittedly the quicker option. However, I think you’ll be intrigued to read more about the benefits of soaking pumpkin seeds before roasting them. It’s the only way we ever do it! Don’t worry, they’ll still be plenty crunchy. More crunchy than ever in fact.

Did you know? You can use this roasted pumpkin seeds recipe with any type of hard winter squash seeds. Butternut squash, acorn squash, hubbard squash, spaghetti squash – you name it! Like pumpkin seeds, all winter squash seeds are edible and highly nutritious. 


Five halves of sugar pie pumpkins are facing upwards exposing their flesh and seeds. The seeds are fairly exposed and some are more stuck in the inner guts.


Are roasted pumpkin seeds good for you?


Heck yes, and even more so once they’re soaked! Pumpkin seeds are notoriously rich in minerals, including magnesium, manganese, iron, copper, and zinc. They also contain notable amounts of protein, vitamins K and B2, folate, potassium, healthy (polyunsaturated) fats, and antioxidants. Compared to shelled pumpkin seeds you’re likely to buy in stores, homemade roasted pumpkin seeds with the outer shell still intact contain even more fiber. Fall season aside, we buy these organic sprouted pumpkin seeds to add on top of salads chili, soup, sautéed veggies, and other meals – all year long!


Why soak pumpkin seeds before roasting?


Fresh roasted pumpkin seeds can be a bit tough – both in texture, and on your belly. But soaking pumpkin seeds in a mild salt water brine before roasting them provides several benefits that help! 


Increased nutritional value

Soaking pumpkin seeds reduces phytic acid content. Considered an ‘anti-nutrient’, phytic acid is a natural substance commonly found in grains, legumes, nuts and seeds – including pumpkin seeds. Phytic acid binds with minerals and thereby inhibits our bodies from absorbing those minerals, along with vitamins, proteins, and other nutrients in food. Phytic acid can also exacerbate unpleasant gastrointestinal symptoms for some people, such as bloating and gas. 

Yet when you soak pumpkin seeds in water, it activates the sprouting process and neutralizes much of the phytic acids along with other enzyme inhibitors. This means soaked and roasted pumpkin seeds are more nourishing – because all those stellar nutrients in them are now more bioavailable! They are also easier to digest. This follows the same reasoning as why sourdough is healthier than other bread, or why sprouted grains and seeds are popular ‘health foods’.


Better flavor and texture

While it may seem counterintuitive, soaking pumpkin seeds before roasting them actually results in crunchier finished pumpkin seeds! The soaking process helps soften the otherwise chewy exterior shell of the seed, enabling it to crisp up better in the oven. Combined with the reduced phytic acid content, this makes soaked and roasted pumpkin seeds more gentle on your stomach and more enjoyable to eat! Finally, soaking pumpkin seeds in salt water means that some of the salt is absorbed and helps to flavor the seeds more deeply.


Flexible timing

Again, soaking pumpkin seeds before roasting is totally optional, but I find it worth the effort. And even though it’s technically an ‘extra’ step, I find it adds additional flexibility to your cooking schedule. Rather than rushing to roast the pumpkin seeds immediately after cleaning them out from the pumpkin, they can simply hang out in a bath until you’re ready for them. Or, you could even drain them after their extended soak, pop them in the fridge, and roast them a few days later.


HOW TO SOAK AND ROAST PUMPKIN SEEDS


Ingredients & Supplies Needed


  • Fresh pumpkin seeds. You can use jack-o-lantern pumpkins, decorative pumpkins, baking pumpkins, or other hard winter squash seeds. For this particular batch of soaked and roasted pumpkin seeds, we used the seeds from several sugar pie pumpkins. The pumpkins were roasted too – to make a big batch of our favorite three-bean pumpkin chili (vegan) plus a few jars of homemade pumpkin puree to save and use in recipes later. 
  • Sea salt
  • Water (enough to soak the seeds in a bowl)
  • Seasonings of choice
  • Mixing bowl and strainer
  • A baking sheet


Instructions


Prep

  • Gather your fresh pumpkin seeds. Separate the seeds from the pumpkin flesh as much as possible. Rinse the seeds well in a colander. Then, transfer the pumpkin seeds to a clean bowl to soak in. 
  • Quick tip: Rather than scooping everything out of the pumpkin (guts and seeds included) I find it is easiest to pinch and pull the pumpkin seeds away from the pumpkin flesh by hand while it is still firmly attached inside. Then I scrape the seed-free ‘guts’ out after.


Two sugar pie pumpkin halves are sitting flesh side up and DeannaCat is pulling away some of the seeds from the guts as they are still connected to the inner walls. There is a bowl of shucked pumpkin seeds next to the pumpkins.
Six halves of sugar pie pumpkins lay flesh side up, their insides are clean of seeds with the remaining guts still left behind. In the middle of the pumpkins lies a white ceramic bowl full of shucked pumpkin seeds. Some of the seeds still have orange pumpkin flesh stuck to them. They will soon be rinsed, strained, and soaked in salt water brine. Soaking roasted pumpkin seeds will help make for a more crunchy and nutritional snack.
Look how clean the seeds are already, before rinsing! That’s because I pulled them away from the pumpkin flesh instead of scooping it all out together.


Soak the Pumpkin Seeds

  • Next, create a mild salt water brine to pour over the seeds. Combine about 1/2 Tbsp of salt for every 2 cups of water used. The salt provides flavor, but also reduces the ability for any harmful bacteria to develop in the water, similar to a fermentation brine.
  • Leave the bowl out on the counter and allow the pumpkin seeds to soak for 6 hours minimum, up to 24 hours. If we gut our pumpkins in the morning, we let the pumpkin seeds soak all day and then proceed to the next step before bed (letting them air dry overnight). Or, when we’re cooking or carving pumpkins in the evening, we soak the seeds overnight and drain them in the morning. (You could also drain them and then store them in the fridge for a couple days before roasting if that works best for your schedule.)


A white ceramic bowl is full of raw pumpkin seeds. A glass measuring cup is pouring a salt water brine into the bowl from the upper right of the image. Soaking roasted pumpkin seeds for 6 to 24 hours is an important step in making the best roasted pumpkin seeds.


Dry

  • Before roasting, it is best to let the soaked pumpkin seeds dry out a bit before they go in the oven. They’ll be the most crunchy this way! 
  • First, drain the seeds in a stainer and shake away excess water. 
  • Next, we dry our soaked pumpkin seeds by spreading them out on a clean, lint-free tea towel. Doing this on a baking sheet makes it easy to move them around as needed. If possible, let the seeds air dry for several hours, tossing them on occasion. We’ve also expedited the process by patting them dry and proceeding to the next step sooner. 


Raw pumpkin seeds are spread out onto a baking sheet that is lined with a lint free towel to dry.
After draining the salt water, the seeds sat out to dry overnight on a cloth-lined tray.


Season

  • Now is the time to get creative and season your soaked pumpkin seeds however you see fit! Keep it simple with a sprinkle of sea salt, or go all out and add a tasty mix of several seasonings. In this particular batch, we used coconut oil, salt, and a sprinkle of paprika.
  • Place the soaked pumpkin seeds (now fairly dry) in a bowl to toss with seasonings and evenly coat them.
  • At minimum, I recommend using melted coconut oil, butter, or olive oil plus a sprinkle of sea salt. We don’t usually measure, but about 1 tablespoon of melted oil or butter per two cups of pumpkin seeds is a good ballpark.
  • Sprinkle salt over as you would when seasoning vegetables or popcorn, but keep in mind they’re already mildly salty from the salt water soak. You can always add more later!


Ideas for roasted pumpkin seed seasonings

Create savory roasted pumpkin seeds with the addition of paprika, garlic salt or garlic powder, onion powder, chipotle seasoning, curry powder, ‘everything but the bagel seasoning’, powdered ranch seasoning, nutritional yeast, or parmesan cheese.

You could also go the sweet route and make candied pumpkin seeds by using cinnamon, nutmeg, clove, and even a little ginger powder, brown sugar or maple syrup. Check out our Sweet & Salty Rosemary Roasted Mixed Nuts recipe as a similar idea!


Raw pumpkin seeds are shown after soaking. They have been coated with coconut oil and sprinkled with salt and paprika.
Seasoned, before going into the oven.


Roast the Pumpkin Seeds & Enjoy!

  • Preheat the oven to 325°F.
  • Spread the pumpkin seeds out in a single layer on a baking sheet. Optional: line the baking sheet with a silicone mat or tin foil for easy clean-up. 
  • Bake the soaked pumpkin seeds for approximately 30 to 45 minutes, until lightly golden and crunchy. Stir and toss the seeds several times throughout the process to promote even roasting, about every 15 minutes. 
  • Keep in mind that soaked and roasted pumpkin seeds will be more chewy straight out of the oven, but will crisp up as they cool!
  • Once your roasted pumpkin seeds have fully cooled, transfer them to an airtight container with a lid for storage like this glass flip-top jar. 


Can you eat whole pumpkin seeds?

Yes, you can absolutely eat whole pumpkin seeds. No need to remove the shell; just pop them in your mouth as-is! In the grocery store, you mostly see green-colored shelled pumpkin seeds. However, the outer shell of the pumpkin seed is 100% edible, and contains a lot of beneficial minerals and fiber too! And as we’ve already explored, soaking pumpkin seeds in salt water before roasting helps to make the normally tough, chewy outer shell more crunchy and much easier to digest.


Roasted pumpkin seeds are shown on a baking sheet after they have been roasted. There is a large wooden spoon laying over the baking sheet of seeds with some of the seeds piled onto the spoon. Soaking roasted pumpkin seeds before cooking will make them more nutritious and crunchy.
A glass flip top container is shown full to the brim with roasted pumpkin seeds. They are golden brown with specks of salt and paprika. There is a large wooden spoon in the background that has roasted pumpkin flowing over the edges.


That’s all there is to it!


All in all, you can’t go wrong with soaked and roasted pumpkin seeds. They’re delicious, extra nutritious, and incredibly easy to make. Not to mention, making homemade roasted pumpkin seeds is the perfect zero-waste solution to fall festivities or recipes that involve whole pumpkins. I hope you love this crunchy snack as much as we do!

Please feel free to ask questions, leave a review, or simply say hi in the comments below. Spread the love of pumpkins (and nutrient-dense foods) by pinning or sharing the post too!


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4.59 from 39 votes

Crunchy Soaked and Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Got pumpkin seeds? Don't let them go to waste! Instead, try this roasted pumpkin seeds recipe. Soaking pumpkin seeds before roasting makes them exponentially more nutritious, easy to digest, flavorful, and crunchy! You can use this recipe with any type of pumpkin or hard winter squash seeds, including jack-o-lantern, butternut, or acorn squash.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time40 mins
Soak Time6 hrs
Course: Holiday Dish, Party Food, Snack
Keyword: crunchy pumpkin seeds, homemade pumpkin seeds, roasted pumpkin seeds, soaked pumpkin seeds

Equipment

  • Mixing bowl for soaking
  • Strainer
  • Baking sheet
  • Oven

Ingredients

  • fresh raw pumpkin seeds
  • sea salt, for soaking and seasoning
  • water
  • melted coconut oil, butter, or olive oil (about 1 Tbsp per 2 cups seeds)
  • additional seasonings of choice (optional)

Instructions

  • Separate the seeds from the pumpkin flesh/guts as much as possible. Rinse well in a colander. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a clean bowl to soak in. 
  • Create a mild salt water brine to pour over the seeds. Combine about 1/2 Tbsp of salt for every 2 cups of water used.
  • Leave the bowl out on the counter and allow the pumpkin seeds to soak for 6 hours minimum, up to 24 hours
  • Drain the seeds in a stainer and shake away excess water. Allow the seeds to air dry for a few hours if possible, such as spread out on a clean lint-free tea towel. You can also pat them dry and move on to roasting more quickly if needed. 
  • Place the soaked pumpkin seeds (now fairly dry) in a bowl to toss with seasonings and evenly coat them. Add 1 Tbsp of melted coconut oil, butter, or olive oil per two cups of pumpkin seeds, plus a sprinkle of sea salt. *See more seasoning ideas in the notes below.
  • Preheat the oven to 325°F. Spread the pumpkin seeds out in a single layer on a baking sheet. Optional: line the baking sheet with a silicone mat or tin foil for easy clean-up. 
  • Bake the soaked pumpkin seeds for approximately 30 to 45 minutes, until lightly golden and crunchy. Stir and toss the seeds several times throughout the process to promote even roasting, about every 15 minutes. (Note: they'll crisp up even more as they cool down)
  • Once your roasted pumpkin seeds have fully cooled, transfer them to an airtight container with a lid for storage. Enjoy!

Notes

Additional Seasoning Ideas
Savory: paprika, garlic salt or garlic powder, onion powder, chipotle seasoning, curry powder, ‘everything but the bagel seasoning’, powdered ranch seasoning, nutritional yeast, or parmesan cheese.
Sweet: cinnamon, nutmeg, clove, ginger powder, brown sugar or maple syrup. 



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36 Comments

  • Julie

    5 stars
    These are the best! I used olive oil and chili powder. They were so good I ate all of them in one sitting. I couldn’t believe how good they tasted. I tried another recipe for years and almost skipped this year because it didn’t seem worth the trouble. Next year I’ll buy a bigger pumkin. 😁

  • Marina

    5 stars
    These are fantastic! The best I’ve ever made! Every Halloween I find a new recipe to try but am always disappointed in the outcome – too salty, too chewy, too dry. This takes the cake. I used seeds from 3 pie pumpkins, followed the recipe exactly, and they came out perfectly:
    roasted with 1 Tbsp of butter, in the oven for 30 minutes in 15 min increments to toss, added minimal salt (added a bit more after they were out of the oven). Amazing flavor! This is a keeper for sure.

      • Arnel

        4 stars
        When n how do I remove the outer white part of the pumpkin seed? If I do that will it give me the green pepita? Do I roast them after removing the white outer shell?

        • Aaron (Mr. DeannaCat)

          Hi Arnel, we don’t remove the outer shell as it is a bit laborious, for the most part, the seeds will still be soft enough to eat while there are usually a few that may be a tad chewy due to the outer husk. If you did want to remove the pepita, I would try and do it after the seeds have roasted for a bit but I don’t have any experience with it. Good luck!

  • Libby

    5 stars
    In the past I have boiled my pumpkin seeds before roasting them to make them easier to chew. Sometimes it has worked well and other times they are still too tough for me to eat. Do you have any thoughts on boiling instead of soaking? I am just cut up our Halloween pumpkin (a pie size) and am putting some in to soak overnight and hope to have a good reesult tomorrow!

    • Aaron (Mr. DeannaCat)

      Hi Libby, we haven’t boiled the pumpkin seeds before roasting. You likely won’t get the same nutritional benefits (for example, it wouldn’t reduce phytic acid) as the heat will kill the enzymes that do the work in a long and cold soak. Hope that helps and good luck!

  • Olivia

    5 stars
    Have roasted pumpkin seeds using your method a few times and love it!!! How long will the pumpkin seeds last in the fridge once drained? I drained mine then accidentally left them in the fridge for a week. Do you think they’re still okay to roast up and eat?

    • Aaron (Mr. DeannaCat)

      Hi Olivia, it seems you are likely right on the edge for storing raw pumpkin seeds in the fridge, if they don’t smell or have any mold type growths, you should be fine roasting them as soon as possible. Good luck!

  • Suzie

    I’m so excited to try your recipe! This is my first time sprouting, excuse me, soaking, seeds. Yours is the best recipe I have found and I appreciate all your explanations and tips!

    • Aaron (Mr. DeannaCat)

      Hi Lydia, I don’t think they should be bad, hopefully just plain water helped some. Roast them up and see how they turn out.

      • Brandy

        5 stars
        I love pumpkin seeds. They are my favorite snack. I have never soaked the seeds so this was really fun to try since you said they’d be crunchy 🙂 I took out some pureed pumpkin I had in the freezer (I love the flavor of pumpkin, yet I don’t like pumpkin pie) I just cut a chunk about 1/2 cup plus 2 cloves fresh garlic pressed and the salt. I soaked them over night. Then strained them let dry popped in the oven. They were fantastic and yes they were CRUNCHY. I give 5 stars.

  • Betsy Bryan

    5 stars
    I made these from our Halloween pumpkin this year. I soaked for almost 24 hours before drying and roasting. I do not expect them to last through the week! I went totally purist with olive oil and kosher salt. So, so good!

  • ANA

    5 stars
    Dear Deanna

    Thank you for the recipe! eating pumpin seeds is completely unusual to me, I´ve never heard of it in my country (Chile). So I was amazed by how good these are! I will definitely prepare them again for my family as a new treat,THANKS. Love your page and your garden 🙂

    • Kellee Jarvis

      5 stars
      THIS WILL BE MY SECOND TIME USING THIS METHOD. MY AND I FAMILY LOVED THEM LAST AUTUMN. WE COULDN’T WAIT TO DO IT AGAIN THIS YEAR. I JUST FINISHED DRYING THE SEEDS. I’M ABOUT TO POP THE FIRST BATCH INTO THE OVEN NOW. OLIVE OIL, A PINCH OF SEA SALT, CHILLI POWDER AND A LITTLE BIT OF TAJIN.

    • Aaron (Mr. DeannaCat)

      Hi Michelle, these should keep fine in an airtight container for at least a week. They are still edible after that time though we have found they become slightly less crunchy. Hope that helps.

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